POUGHILL  THROUGH  THE  EYES  OF  ARTISTS

 

 

 

  The painting illustrated above called simply; Poughill, Cornwall was painted by Harold Lawes (1865-1940)
Harold William Allen Lawes, was a landscape painter from Primrose Hill, London and an artist who travelled extensively in the two decades prior to World War I. He is mainly known for painting country scenes and landscapes typically similar to this undated one of Poughill.
This Gives us a view looking down Poughill Road towards the church, with the familiar Pudners Cottage on the right and Pudners house main building immediately before the church. There may be a little artistic licence with the steps and garden in front of the cottage unless where the road was painted before the forties, it was much lower.

 

 

Pudners Cottage Poughill

 

< Poughill in the snow - painted by the Devon based artist: Susan E. Rex is an oil on canvas board giving us a different slant on Pudners Cottage from a similar position to the painting above, but in winter.

 

 Edward William Trick (born in Exeter 1902-1991) was totally deaf and dumb. On his vi st to Poughill and Coombe, he chooses the same angle of Pudners cottage for his watercolour seen below.   He studied art under John Shapland the former headmaster of the Exeter School of Art and his subjects are all west country views, including cathedrals and churches but most of his works were landscapes including Dartmoor and Exmoor views.

(ABOVE) G.E.Bayley's coloured drawing of Poughill became a post card almost undoubtedly sold in the Poughill Stores.

Just outside the village boundary, but a painting that needed to be included is this watercolour of Inch's shop, by local artist Charles H. Branscombe 1919. Painted from the corner of Stone hill looking down Poughill Road towards Bude and the coast in the distance.

 

 

 

 

 Francis Towne (1739 - 1816) was a British water colourist and painter of landscapes who was drawing master at Exeter. The exact date of this painting of Pough Hill 'near Bude,' which he added to the inscription on the back, we presume to differentiate the setting from that of the Devonshire Poughill, is not known.

 The vantage point, Towne purportedly painted this picture from of the church and relatively small number of dwellings from is an odd one with what we think is Bude bay in the background.  There is just not the steepness to the hills that appear in this picture suggests and certainly, the church with its village buildings tumbling away below it, is not an accurate rendition of the geology here. It is a little questionable.


 

 

Two views of the Preston Gate Inn in the 80's - Poughill, by Beth Altabas (British 20th century) who came from Beardon cottage, Boyton near Launceston.

A drawing of the Old Post Office Poughill by Douglas Davidson

Preston Gate Cottages, Poughill Road , up Hill. Artist unknown.
   

The Church

 A modern drawing of Poughill by Harry McConville of Bude.

 

 

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Poughill as seen through the eyes of artists. Oils and watercolours of the village

Poughill in Paintings and Watercolours | Pudners, Church Cottages | History